Why do I always lose at roulette?

Why do I always need to play a higher number than the person next to me? Why don’t I just put down a lower number when starting to play? I’m losing all the high-value bets!”

When people ask me why I play roulette, I tell them that it involves risk, and to expect high losses. A roulette wheel is simply a large piece of metal. If I put down 10 or 15 roulette coins in a row, and the number changes, the wheel will eventually get stuck somewhere in the middle (sometimes the number is wrong, and the wheel will turn over, or the wheel will be a little crooked, or the edge of the wheel will be a little shorter than the edge of the wheel when you are doing it correctly). If I put down a coin of 10, my wheel will eventually get stuck at 10, so I would have to go back 10 to get to my desired number, at which point the wheel should turn over, and the number on the other end of the wheel will change again. It’s just an iterated loop.

I can’t count how many times I’ve lost my money because I didn’t put down enough “high value” bets. Even when I am very confident about my high-value bets, I can sometimes lose more than I would have thought. If you play roulette too often, some people say, you lose patience, and then get annoyed that you keep losing.

Roulette is like a betting machine, in a sense. You can bet in roulette if you want to, but there won’t be a pot to play with (only a wheel). Also, there will be no one else at the table. There is no room for mistakes, so when you lose, you can move on—if you can.

I bet on the roulette wheel, but when it’s time to pay the bills, all I can think about is “How am I going to pay the bills?” If someone is paying the bills, I can just tell them, “We won a penny.” If I want to pay the bills, I can just tell them, “We won a penny.” It’s like paying the check. It’s not fun. If it’s a big win, like “Our payroll for the week was $7,933.50” or “Our payroll for the week was $7.5 million” or “Our payroll for the week was $9 million,” then it’s more fun.