Is learning ukulele hard?

Learning ukulele is a challenging concept for most people. You get stuck at the wrong note (most likely because of a lack of understanding) and have a hard time practicing.

In the video below, Ben (with his girlfriend Sarah) talks about the most common mistakes people make when learning ukulele.

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Happy teaching your ukulele!

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(Courtesy: University Park)

Mallory Rubin had never heard of the “Black Lives Matters” movement until she heard one of its members say that the movement’s primary purpose is to shut down police encounters between young black men and officers.

That idea, Rubin says, was shocking, but then it sunk into the dark recesses of her mind instead of going straight to the surface with her.

At first, the movement didn’t excite her. It was a movement that seemed to have an endless array of demands, and she didn’t quite see how the groups could be working together to solve some problem. But her curiosity grew. So she became a member.

“I got really involved in just finding these folks who were fighting for change and really looking at what was happening that I felt was really worthy,” Rubin tells The Post. “I was just like, ‘Wow.’ I mean, it’s amazing what the community can come together and do, to change the police.”

(Bridgette D. Bell /For Washington Post)

She found that those changes were driven by people of color living in the neighborhoods being policed, she says, not white people.

“Just watching black men experience these interactions, which was so common and so commonplace — there were more [police] encounters with black men than with white men — people could see the injustice,” the 32-year-old says. “And so we started to notice these conversations and these concerns about policing